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Projector Technology - How Projectors Work

Here, we’ll introduce you to the basic business and home theater projector technologies that make up our portable projector lineup, suggest some example uses, and explain some of the features that you might want to consider when purchasing a projector. The operation of today’s business and home theater projector systems is based on receiving an electric signal (either analog or digital) from a data source (computer, VCR, DVD, etc.), transforming the signal into an image, and projecting the image onto a screen. To do this, the signal must first be converted into a digital signal. If sent as analog, it is passed through an analog-to-digital signal converter. The digital signal is now ready to be processed into an image for projection. Currently, there are two technologies used in business and home theater projectors to display images: liquid-crystal display (LCD Projector) and Digital Light Processing (DLP Projector).

LCD Projector

For a LCD projector, the digital signal is processed to polysilicon panels. A light source is passed through a series of dichroic mirrors to separate the various color wavelengths and then through the polysilicon panels where activated pixels process the light into a final compiler before projection through the lens and onto the screen.

DLP Projector

With a DLP projector, the digital signal is processed to a DMDT chip. The light source is passed through a color wheel and onto the DMDT chip, and is then reflected off the chip through the lens and onto the screen. The introduction of this rather new technology has led to the further miniaturization of business and home theater projector systems.